Markets and its types

A market is a place where there are shopkeepers who sell their goods in exchange for money. People buy different types of goods from the market like clothes, eatables, groceries, clothes, electronic goods, and many others. Some shops have only single types of products while some provide a variety. For example, a cloth shop will have clothes only and people can buy clothes for themselves and their family. Similarly, grocery stores have many kinds of groceries. In economics, the market is defined as buyers and sellers coming together to buy and sell goods and services. Features of market A market has different features, which are described here. In economics, the market is referred to as a place having either one or a set of the commodity. A market covers a wide area and has no restriction of location. A market must have a group of buyers and sellers. Sellers and buyers both must know about the product to be bought or sold. Price of products may change due to the competition. Types of markets There are many types of markets, which people can avail to purchase the goods they need. The main classification of the markets is the product market and factor market. Factor market includes buying and selling of land, capital, labor, and many other such things. Different types of classification are as follows. Classification based on geographical location The rating based on geographic location is as follows. Local Market: This type of market is restricted to a local region or area, and buyers have to come to that area to buy the required product. Mostly perishable goods are sold in this market. Regional Market: The area of these markets is more comprehensive than that of local markets. These regions can include a city or a state. National Market: This type of market is spread in the whole country. International Market: In this market, buying and selling of goods are done internationally, and the products that are allowed in a country can be sold. Classification based on time The rating of markets based on time is as follows: Very Short Period Market: In this type of market, the supply of goods done for a brief period. Such markets include fruits, vegetables, meat, etc. Short Period Market: The period of this market is little more than the previous one. Supply is adjusted for a little more time in this market. Long Period Market: In this market, supply can be changed easily as the goods here are not easily perishable. Classification based on the nature of the transaction Ranking of the market based on the deal is as follows: Spot Market: In this market, sales are completed at the spot. Future Market: In this type of market credit transactions are done. The promise of payment is made after a period. Classification based on regulation Ranking of the market based on the rule is as follows: Regulated Market: In this market, government authorities are also included to ensure whether any malpractice is being done or trade is being made relatively. Such types of exchanges include stock market. Unregulated Market: This market is free of any regulations, and everything is decided based on market forces. Wrapping Up In this article, we have discussed the market, its features, and types. Exchanges can be classified on any basis, but the main thing that is done here is the interaction between buyer and seller. The buyers come to the market and check the products they want along with quality and price, and the sellers tell about the features and provoke the buyers to buy the products.

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FAQ

Will Amendment 1 ban abortion in Tennessee? What is the current abortion law in Tennessee? Why is a constitutional amendment necessary? How does the Amendment process work? How exactly does Amendment 1 read? In simple words, what is the thrust of the Amendment? Why isn’t it worded in more understandable terms? How many abortion facilities are there in Tennessee? How many abortions are reported in Tennessee? This FAQ is created by our dear friend from DavaReview. He’s a online entrepreneur with years of experience so be sure to check his website https://davareview.com/ where you can discover tons of reviews about internet marketing tools and strategies. Will Amendment 1 ban abortion in Tennessee? A: The amendment restores the Tennessee Constitution to where it was prior to the 2000 Tennessee State Supreme Court decision by making the constitution neutral on the question of abortion.  Abortion would not be banned and remains legal across the United States due to the Roe v. Wade United States Supreme Court decision in 1973. What is the current abortion law in Tennessee? A: Although Tennessee has historically been a national leader in the passage of protective, pro-life legislation, the TN Supreme Court stripped away many of these protections with its finding of a fundamental right to abortion in our state Constitution on September 15, 2000. As a result, abortion policy in Tennessee has become basically ‘abortion on demand.’ The protective laws still on the books include a one-parent consent requirement for minors seeking abortions and a provision in the state budget which prohibits the use of TennCare dollars for abortion except in the cases of rape, incest or to protect the life of the mother. (The language does not address the possible use of state staff or facilities for abortion, or the subsidy of state employee health plans which include abortion.) Neither parental consent nor abortion funding were challenged in PP v. Sundquist and both could face being ruled unconstitutional if challenged by the abortion movement. An opinion by the Tennessee Attorney General in 2008 regarding parental consent underscores this possibility: “The Tennessee Supreme Court has not had occasion to review the constitutionality of the Parental Consent for Abortion by Minors Act. However…we believe that the Act is defensible under the Tennessee Constitution, although the matter is not free from doubt.” Tennessee Attorney General, Opinion No. 08-40, February 28, 2008  Why is a constitutional amendment necessary? A: With the Tennessee Supreme Court finding that the Tennessee Constitution provides a fundamental right to abortion, any laws which are interpreted to impact a “fundamental” right must be very narrowly written as to avoid infringing on the protected right. As Justice William Barker pointed out in his dissent, only by amending the Constitution can pro-life Tennesseans hope to positively influence public policy again. (See Barker Dissent, Section II)  How does the Amendment process work? A: In order to successfully amend the state constitution, a resolution must be introduced and then receive a simple majority of votes in both houses during any given two year session of the Legislature. The same resolution must then be reintroduced and passed by a 2/3 “super-majority” of legislators seated during the successive legislative session. Finally, after passing two sessions of the Legislature the language is placed on the ballot for voter approval during the next gubernatorial race. SJR 127 was passed by both the Tennessee House and Senate in 2009 and received second passage by the required 2 / 3 super-majority in 2011. As a result the language has been placed on the November 2014 ballot for voter approval or rejection as Amendment 1. The

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CHURCH PARTICIPATION

Help Tennessee Say Yes to Amendment 1 10 Things Your Church Can Do: 1. Schedule a five minute presentation to show the Restore Life Video 2. Invite a Yes on 1 speaker to address your congregation. 3. Receive an offering to help with media buys and campaign materials. 4. Designate a budget gift to help blanket Tennessee with Yes on 1 yard signs. 5. Purchase Yes on 1 buttons and t-shirts for your congregation. To purchase a button click here. 6. Encourage members to contact the campaign regarding individual contributions. Click here to donate today.  7. Urge members to Vote Yes on Amendment 1 on at least the Sunday before early starts (October 12th) and the Sunday before Election Day (Nov. 2nd) Contact the campaign office for bulletin inserts and palm cards or get them here. 8. During early voting through Election Day, include reminders about Amendment 1 through bulletin blurbs or email . Check out our sample announcements. 9. Conduct voter registration or registration update efforts. 10. Copy and share this information with leaders of other churches. Sign up with Yes on 1 today to get started promoting Amendment 1 in your church.

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Yes on 1 Files State Court Motion on Behalf of Disenfranchised Voters

Yes on 1 Campaign Seeks to Intervene On Behalf of Voters Threatened with Disenfranchisement Motion Filed Friday Morning in State Court Nashville, April 29, 2016—A motion filed Friday morning by proponents of Yes on 1 seeks to intervene on behalf of state voters who are threatened with having their votes thrown out as a result of last week’s ruling by federal Judge Kevin Sharp.  In an unprecedented decision, Sharp directed state election officials to undertake a recount of the November 2014 general election and to void all ballots cast on Amendment 1 by voters who did not also vote in the governor’s race. On Tuesday, Tennessee’s Attorney General announced an appeal of Sharp’s ruling to the U.S. Sixth Circuit stating, “We obviously disagree with the federal court’s decision…Simply put, deciding what vote is required to amend the Tennessee Constitution is a matter of state law to be determined by a Tennessee Court.” In a separate action, Daniel Horwitz, counsel for the Yes on 1 Ballot Committee, prepared a motion asking state court Judge Michael Binkley to allow supporters of the pro-life amendment to intervene in the case in order to address the unique harm threatened to YES voters that the federal judge seeks to disenfranchise.  “The right to vote is precious, and Amendment 1 supporters who were just stripped of their right to vote as a consequence of Judge Sharp’s ruling deserve a voice in this proceeding,” said Horwitz. “We strongly believe that the Tennessee Constitution does not compel voters to vote for candidates whom they do not support in order to be allowed to exercise their right to vote on constitutional amendments.” The motion includes affidavits from 7 Tennessee voters who did not vote in the 2014 governor’s race.  Each offers a diverse basis for their decision including 2 self-identified democrats who voted for the amendment but did not cast a vote in the governor’s race due to their view that there was not a credible gubernatorial candidate to support on the democratic ticket. “I have worked to protect the rights of voters in the United States since the 1960s, when my family and I worked to ensure African Americans’ right to vote,” states Dr. David Cassel of Nashville in his affidavit submitted to the state court. “I am deeply aggrieved that my right to vote on an important amendment to Tennessee’s Constitution might be ripped away from me solely because I did not vote for a candidate for governor.” Conversely, several Republicans signed affidavits stating support for Amendment 1 but reluctance to support incumbent governor Bill Haslam due to differences in policy and philosophy.  “I am a conservative Republican,” states Aurora Wright of Shelby County. “Heading into the November 2014 election I was dismayed by much of what Bill Haslam had done in office and I could not in good conscience vote for him.” The 7 affidavits were filed by 5 women and 2 men and include a social worker, retired physician, mechanical engineer, Army veteran, and a Vanderbilt professor. Speaking on their behalf, attorney Horwitz underscored the motion’s purpose. “We intend to obtain an authoritative ruling from the Tennessee Supreme Court, and we will vigorously defend all voters’ unencumbered right to vote at every step of this process.” 

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Protect the People’s Vote

On Friday, October 14, 2016, supporters of the 2014 Amendment dealing with abortion regulation in Tennessee filed a Friend of the Court brief as the 6th Circuit Court of Appeals prepares to consider arguments as to whether the votes of some pro-life Tennesseans may be thrown out. Yes on 1 Ballot Committee is no longer accepting signatures for the brief. For more information about the filing of the brief, please click here. To read the brief and view the 8,850 signatures of Tennesseans, please click on the ‘Read the Brief’ button below. Rather than accept defeat, Planned Parenthood is willing to disenfranchise Tennessee voters in order to ensure that Tennessee remains an abortion destination.  That was unacceptable on Election Day 2014 and it remains so nearly two years after clear public approval of Amendment 1. On November 4, 2014, Tennessee voters approved passage of pro-life Amendment 1 to the Tennessee Constitution by a margin of 53-47 percent. Three days later, Planned Parenthood Board Chair, Tracey E. George and other Planned Parenthood Board members filed a federal lawsuit claiming that their voting rights had been violated and that ballots were not properly counted. Yes on 1Ballot Committee responded and calls the lawsuit one more example of pro-abortion activists refusing to trust the “common sense and compassion” of Tennesseans who largely favor legal protections for abortion-vulnerable women, girls and unborn children in our state. “Amendment 1 was passed with a clear majority of Tennesseans casting a vote to approve the language,” said Brian Harris, coordinator for Yes on 1 Ballot Committee. “No voter should be stripped of their right to effect social change with their vote or to positively impact the public policies of their community, state or nation.” On April 22, 2016, Federal District Court Judge Kevin Sharp ruled in favor of the Planned Parenthood plaintiffs and demanded a recount of the ballots on Amendment 1.  Sharp also maintained that the ballot of any Tennessean having voted for Amendment 1 but not also casting a vote in the Governor’s race must be thrown out. The case is now on appeal to the U.S. Sixth Circuit Court of Appeals in Cincinnati with a hearing date to be set. The Yes on 1 Ballot Committee urges concerned Tennesseans to Protect the People’s Vote on Amendment 1 by signing the Friend-of-the-Court (amicus) brief being filed by Yes on 1. Make your voice heard now to defend the lawful outcome of the Amendment 1 vote! You can read the entire text of the Protect the People’s Vote brief (filed 10/14/2016) here. Disclaimer: The version of the Protect The People’s Vote Brief available at this website is a substantively final draft, subject to proofreading and/or technical changes before filing.  By signing this form, you swear or affirm that the information that you provided is true and correct and you acknowledge that you will be added as a signatory to the official amicus brief referred to as ‘Protect the People’s Vote Brief’.  You give Yes on 1 Ballot Committee permission to publish your name in official court filings with the Sixth Circuit U.S. Court of Appeals, future state or federal proceedings, and also in any promotion of ‘Protect the People’s Vote Brief’ that may be circulated publicly.  New signatures collected in connection to the Protect the People’s Vote Brief will be only used in relation to the amicus brief to the Sixth Circuit U.S. Court of Appeals or future state or federal proceedings.  Thank you for standing for Life and in support of protecting the people’s vote on Amendment 1.

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DONATE

Opponents of YES on 1 will be well funded, particularly from out-of-state abortion interest groups. Every concerned Tennessean must commit to prayerfully and financially supporting the efforts of YES on 1.  Please click here to give securely online: https://secure.piryx.com/donate/kgXzVGeM/Yes-on-1-Ballot-Committee/ To mail in your donation, please send it to: Yes on 1PO Box 111696Nashville, TN  37222-1696

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Sign the Pledge Today!

 I PLEDGE TO VOTE YES ON 1 IN 2014! Because of radical court rulings which struck down protections for abortion-vulnerable women and girls, Tennessee has become a destination for those seeking unregulated abortion. Nearly 25% of all abortions in Tennessee are now performed on out-of-state women and nearly half of the state’s abortion facilities are not inspected or licensed by the Tennessee Department of Health due to these court decisions. In November 2014 Tennessee voters will decide whether or not to restore basic health and safety standards in our state for women and girls considering abortion. I will vote Yes on 1 in 2014 to promote health and safety standards in Tennessee for women and girls considering abortion and to prevent Tennessee from remaining an abortion destination!

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Tennessee Ranks 3rd Nationally in the Percentage of Out-of-State Abortions

Tennessee now ranks only behind Kansas and North Dakota in the percent of abortions by out-of-state residents. According to Anita Wadhwani with The Tennessean, “Newly released data on abortion in Tennessee reveal a steady decline in the number of abortions performed over the past decade and a steady increase in the percentage of out-of-state women heading to Tennessee for the procedure.” Wadhwani continues by pointing out that the while the total number of abortions performed in Tennessee  is down 6 percent from a decade ago, “the percentage of women coming from outside Tennessee for abortions increased by more than 30 percent”. Because each of Tennessee’s 8 border states have active policies requiring informed consent, waiting periods and regulation of abortion facilities by state Departments of Health, Tennessee has become a destination for women, girls, spouses, partners and parents seeking unregulated abortion.  In 2010, 24.5% of abortions in Tennessee were performed on women residing out-of-state. These common sense policies once passed by Tennessee’s General Assembly were struck down by the Tennessee Supreme Court in 2000.  Now, Tennessee boasts a broader right to abortion than that recognized by Roe v. Wade or the U.S. Constitution. As a result of the pro-abortion ruling by Tennessee’s Supreme Court in 2000, Tennesseans can no longer enforce common sense protections for abortion-vulnerable women or unborn children. Approval of Amendment 1 by Tennessee voters would allow passage and enforcement of these common sense policies which are designed to protect the health and safety of women and girls considering abortion. Join with other concerned Tennesseans in support of Amendment 1 by signing the pledge to vote YES on 1 on November 4, 2014.

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Radical Pro-Abortion Lobby Continues Effort to Silence TN Voters

Featured in ‘NO’ ads, Planned Parenthood Board Chair Tracey George is Plaintiff Claiming that voter rights were violated and that ballots were not accurately counted in Tuesday’s election, pro-abortion opponents of Amendment 1 have filed suit in federal court asking for the results to be nullified.  Yes on 1 responded and called the lawsuit one more example of pro-abortion activists refusing to trust the “common sense and compassion” of Tennesseans who voted to approve Amendment 1 on November 4. “Amendment 1 was passed with a decisive majority of Tennesseans casting a vote to approve the language,” said Brian Harris, president of Tennessee Right to Life and a coordinator for Yes on 1.  “Even if you wrongly discount those who may have voted for Amendment 1 but not in the Governor’s race, there is still a margin of almost 20,000 votes in favor of the amendment.” “Rather than accept defeat, Planned Parenthood and the nation’s pro-abortion movement are willing to disenfranchise Tennessee voters in order to ensure that Tennessee remains an abortion destination with uninspected, unlicensed abortion facilities,” said Harris.  “That was unacceptable on election day and it remains so days after the passage of Amendment 1.” Yes on 1 remains confident that the pro-abortion lawsuit is a waste of resources and that courts will recognize the clear majority of voters who supported passage of Amendment 1. “We are moving forward to prepare legislation that will restore common sense protections in our state and which reflect the will of the voters as clearly demonstrated in Tuesday’s election,” said Harris. “To do otherwise would be an abdication of the trust placed in us by Tennessee’s electorate.” Review of Vote Counts: 1,353,728 combined votes were cast for all candidates running in Governor’s race. 1,386,355 combined votes were cast for and against Amendment 1. 32,627 more votes were cast for Amendment 1 than the number cast in the Governor’s race.  Amendment 1 required 676,865 YES votes to pass.  Amendment 1 received 729,163 YES votes or 52.6%. Amendment 1 received 52,298 Yes votes in excess of those needed for passage. Even if you disqualify the number of Amendment 1 votes not voting in the Governor’s race but who cast a vote for or against the amendment, YES on 1 still enjoyed a margin of 19,671 votes above the number needed for approval.

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